The Trowbridge Ancestors

THE BRIDGES
ATrowbridge married a Woodbridge and they had a daughter who married a Herkimer
This is a rather interesting group of ancestors.
David Trowbridge married Sarah Woodbridge on 18 October 1770. They married at Hartford, CT. Both families lived in Connecticut and attended Congregational churches. The Woodbridge ancestors were from Simsbury. The Trowbridge ancestors were from Norwalk, Connecticut.

William Trowbridge  1633 1690

William Trowbridge was born in 1633 and baptized at St. Petrock's at Exeter, Devonhire, England on 3 September 1633. William's parents were Thomas and Elizabeth Trowbridge. Thomas Trowbridge was a mercer (dealer in textiles, especially silks) at Exeter. William's grandfather, John Trowbridge, was the Mayor of Taunton, Somerset-shire, England in 1630 and again in 1638. He also was the warden of St. Mary Magdalen Church.
 
In early 1636, William sailed with his father, his brother and his mother to New England. His oldest brother, John, was seven and remained at England. John probably lived with his grandparents in Taunton.
 
The Trowbridges first settled at Dorchester, Mass. (Bay Colony), near Boston. William's younger brother, James, was born at Dorchester, Mass. about 1636. Thomas Trowbridge moved his family to New Haven, CT in 1638, but spent little time there because he was occupied with extensive trade between England, Barbados and the Colonies.
 
William Trowbridge's mother died in 1643. Shortly after she died at New Haven, his father was recalled to England. The Trowbridge boys were only seven, ten, and twelve. Thomas Trowbridge returned to England, never to return to his sons in New England. Thomas' father, John Trowbridge, died at Taunton, Somersetshire, England in July 1649 at the age of 79. Thomas, being his father's only living son, inherited substantial wealth, which is probably what kept him at Taunton, England, until his burial at St Magdelen Church on 7 February 1673.
 
William Trowbridge and his two brothers were left at New Haven, CT under the care of Henry Gibbons, a servant. Gibbons mismanaged the affairs of Thomas' property. The courts put William and his brothers under the care of Sergeant Thomas Jeffery and his wife. When William became of age, he brought Gibbons to court and tried to get him to make restitution, but without success.
- - - from internet
"William Trowbridge propounded to ye court if he might have an account of his father's estate that was left in New Haven, and for this end presented two letters from his father, one dated March 6, 1655, the other March 4, 1658, wherein his father writes, that he marvells that there is not an account of it given. It was told him that some time has been spent in searching ye records, but it could not be cleared. Wherefore he paying the secretary then ye secretary would afford him that help he could therein to clear it."
"January 3, 1664, William Trowbridge having had a warrant for Henry Gibbons to answer him in action of ye case, was now called to clear this action. He required of Henry Gibbons an account of his father's estate that was left with him when he went to England. Wm. Trowbridge was asked by what authority he had made his demand? He showed a letter of attorney from his father, which being read was allowed and accepted. Henry Gibbons said that he had given him an account as well as he could, but the estate was taken out of his hands by order of authority here and therefore it must be referred to ye records. The records having been looked into formerly and matters not found so clear as was desired and there being much business at this time, the case was referred to another time."
At the county court held at New Haven on June 10, 1664, before James Bishop, assistant and moderator, commissioners and a jury in the case of Trowbridge vs. Gibbons:
"Wm. Trowbridge of New Haven, plaintiff, Henry Gibbons of same place, defendant, in the action of the case for an account of the estate of Mr. Thomas Trowbridge of Taunton in the realm of England mentioned in his letters of attorney dated ye 19th of January, 1662, and sometime in ye possession of trust of ye said Henry ye defendant disposed of and not accounted for."
The records of the transaction concerning the estate were read. Mr. Gibbons made some restitution, in which the plaintiff "seemed to be satisfied".
 
William was married at Milford, CT 1657 to Elizabeth Lamberton, the widow of Daniel Sellivant. Elizabeth Lambertom was first married as the second wife of Daniel Sellivant  October 1654. Daniel had died at Virginia in the summer of 1655. William and Elizabeth Trowbridge had at least ten children between 1657 and 1676. James Trowbridge, our ancestor, was born at New Haven, CT on 26 March 1664.
 
In 1664 William was master of the sloop "Cocke", making many voyages out of New Haven. In July of 1667 he became one of the first residents in the parish of West New Haven. He built his house on Lamberton Farm in which he had received a 1/6th share from his father-in-law, George Lamberton. He owned an additional 144 acres on Long Island Sound near Oyster River. In early West Haven town records, William is referred to as a "planter", in later records he is described as a "husbandman". 
 
William was nominated a freeman (a person having full citizenship rights) of the colony of Connecticut on May 13, 1669. The “First Church” in New Haven admitted William and his wife as members on April 28, 1686. He lived on his farm in West Haven the remainder of his life. He made gifts to his children during this lifetime of much of his real estate, so that the inventory of his estate mentions only 55 acres of “second division” land and a small amount of personal property. He made no will. William and Elizabeth had ten children all born in New Haven. Those children were: William; Thomas; Elizabeth; James; Margaret; Hannah; Abigail; Samuel; Mary; and Joseph. They were born in that order between 1657 and 1676.
 
William Trowbridge died at West Haven in November 1690, and Elizabeth there in 1716.

James Trowbridge 1664 - 1732

James Trowbridge was born at New Haven, Ct. on 26 March 1664. His father, William Trowbridge married at Milford, Ct. on 9 March 1657 to Elizabeth Lamberton, the widow of Daniel Sellivant. Elizabeth Lambertom was first married as the second wife of Daniel Sellivant on 17 October 1654. James was one of ten children between 1657 and 1676.
 
In July 1677, the Trowbridges moved to West Haven and built a home on a portion of the Lamberton farm. James' father was a planter, husbandman and a master of the sloop - "Cocke" making two voyages out of New Haven.
 
James Trowbridge was thirteen when the family moved to West Haven. There he grew up with his four brothers and four sisters. James' parents, William and Elizabeth Trowbridge, were members of the First Church of New Haven in 1686. William died at West Haven in November 1690, and Elizabeth there in 1716.
 
James Trowbridge, at the age of twenty-four, married first on 8 November 1688 to Lydia Alsop. James and Lydia Trowbridge had one child. Little James was born on 13 September 1689. James Trowbridge learned the trade of a "cordwainer" or a shoemaker and settled at New Haven, CT. Lydia Alsop died at Stratford, CT. on 6 May 1690, leaving James a widower with a baby boy.
James Trowbridge moved to Stratford, Ct., where they were admitted as members of the Stratford Congregational Church on 8 April 1694. James and Ester Trowbridge had three children. Isaac was born at Stratford about 1693. Esther was born at Stratford about 1695, and Mary was born at Stratford about 1697. Ester died at Stratford in 1697. James Trowbridge was a widower again with four children, ages eight, four, two and an infant.
 
On 19 April 1698 James Trowbridge married at Wilton for the third time to Mary Belding. Mary was born at Hatfield, Mass. on 17 November 1677 to Daniel Belding and Elizabeth Foote. Mary Belding's mother, two brothers and a sister had been killed by the Indians in 1696. Mary's father, another brother and sister had been captured by the Indians and just released. James Trowbridge was a widower with four young children, ages nine to one. Mary Belding was one of fifteen children. Their married life could only get better!
 
James and Mary (Belding) Trowbridge had seven children born between 1701 and 1717. Daniel was born at Stratford on 13 August 1701. Elizabeth was born at Stratford on 1 March 1703. Caleb was born at Stratford on 8 April 1706. John Trowbridge, our ancestor, was born in 1709. Abigail was born at Stratford on 1 September 1712. Lydia was born at Norwalk on 8 May 1715, and Sarah was born at Norwalk on 29 July 1717.
In 1712 James Trowbridge and his family moved to the parish of Wilton in the town of Norwalk, CT, where he purchased a large farm. James was a grand juror in 1719 and the town collector in 1721. The families who bought land in Wilton did not have their own church and were required to attend service in Norwalk each Sunday. . He was one of the original members of the Wilton Congregational Church, becoming a deacon there. He was a grand juror in 1719 and the town collector in 1721.
 
By 1725 there were forty families living in Wilton who wanted their own meetinghouse. Therefore in 1726 with the approval of both the Proprietors and the Wilton settlers, a petition to the General Court in Hartford created the Wilton Parish, "a village enjoying parish privileges" but still part of the town of Norwalk. James was one of the original members of the Wilton Congregational Church, becoming a deacon there. James Trowbridge farmed at Wilton until his death in May 1732. Mary died sometime after 1737.
 

John Trowbridge 1709 - 1777

John Trowbridge was born at Stratford, Ct. on 22 May 1709. The Trowbridge family, with its eight children, moved from Stratford, CT to the parish of Wilton in the town of Norwalk, CT in 1712. After they moved, Mary (Belden) Trowbridge gave birth to three more children: Abigail in 1712, Lydia in 1715 and Sarah in 1717.
 
John Trowbridge married Mary Comstock at Norwalk, Ct about 1735. She was born at Norwalk on 5 August 1710 to Captain Samuel Comstock and Sarah Hanford. Capt. Comstock had been Deputy to the General Assembly from 1726 to 1730. Mary was the third child of seven children.
 
John and Mary Trowbridge lived at Wilton where their first six children were born. Their first child, John was born about 1736. David Trowbridge was born in 1738. Sarah was born in 1739, Ann in 1741, Isaac in 1744 and Hester in 1748.
In the spring of 1749 the Trowbridge family moved to Danbury, CT. Mary gave birth to two more children. Lydia was born in 1755 and Phoebe in 1751. Mary's father, Captain Samuel Comstock, died in October 1752 and was buried at the Old East Norwalk Cemetery. John Trowbridge was chosen to be a selectman of Danbury in 1753. A selectman is one of a board of town officers chosen annually in New England communities to manage local affairs.
 
John Trowbridge served in the French and Indian War as a corporal in the 5th Company, 4th Regiment of Connecticut, from 12 September 1755 to 8 November 1755. He was a sergeant in the 7th Company, 3rd Regiment of Connecticut at Fort William Henry in October 1756 and again in August 1757.
 
In 1761, John Trowbridge was appointed the collector of rates in Danbury. The Trowbridge children grew up and married at Wilton in Danbury, CT. Their son, Isaac married for the 2nd time to Lucy Foote. Their daughters, Sarah and Hester married the Benedict boys. Sarah married Lemuel in 1763 and Hester married Aaron in 1768.
John Trowbridge was a prominent member of the Danbury Congregational Church. John was a farmer and worked his land, just west of Danbury, until his death in May 1777.

David Trowbridge 1738 - 1816

David Trowbridge was born in 1738. David Trowbridges' parents, John and Mary Trowbridge, lived at Wilton where their first six children were born. Their first child, John was born about 1736. Then came David Trowbridge in 1738. Sarah was born in 1739, Ann in 1741, Isaac in 1744 and Hester in 1748.
 
In the spring of 1749 the Trowbridge family moved to Danbury, CT. Mary gave birth to two more children. Lydia was born in 1755 and Phoebe in 1751. David's father was chosen to be a selectman of Danbury in 1753 and served in the French and Indian War from 1755 to 1757 at Fort William Henry. The Trowbridge children grew up and married at Wilton in Danbury, CT. Isaac married for the 2nd time to Lucy Foote. Sarah and Hester married the Benedict boys. . David's youngest sister, Ann, married in 1760 and lived in Litchfield CT with her husband Joseph Thomas.
 
David Trowbridge married Sarah Woodbridge on 18 October 1770. They married at Hatfield, Mass. The Trowbridges lived in Danbury and the Woodbridges lived in Hatfield, MassDavid Trowbridge was a felt maker at Deerfield and Hartford, Ct. He later became a tavern and hotel keeper at Deerfield and at Hartford. After they were married, David and Sarah Trowbridge settled at Hatfield, CT. While living in Hatfield they had three children. Their first child, Sarah, was born in 1771. Mary was born in July 1773 and Henry was born in September 1776. The following month, their first born, Sarah, died at the age of five.
 
David’s father, John Trowbridge was a prominent member of the Danbury Congregational Church. John was a farmer and worked his land, just west of Danbury, until his death in May 1777.
 
In 1777 the Trowbridge family moved to Amherst, Mass. Here Eunice Trowbridge was born in 1777. In 1779, Sarah gave birth to another little girl, which they named Sarah. Another boy and girl, David and Susan, were born.
During the American Revolution, Danbury was an important military supply depot for the Continental Army. British General (and former provincial governor of New York) William Tryon launched an expedition in April 1777 to raid a Continental Army supply depot at Danbury.  On April 25, about 2,000 British troops landed near Fairfield and marched inland, reaching Danbury without resistance on the morning of April 26. They chased away the small garrison, destroyed a large number of supplies, and set fire to parts of the town.
 
 
The Trowbridge family then moved to Amherst, Springfield County, Mass.  Here Eunice Trowbridge was born in 1777. In 1779, Sarah gave birth to another little girl, which they named Sarah. Another boy and girl, David and Susan, were born.
 
David Trowbridge was in the Amherst Company of the Militia under Captain Moses Cook and served in the defense of the Government of Springfield for seven days in September 1786 during the Shay's Rebellion. The rebellion was an armed insurrection by farmers against the state government. Debt-ridden farmers, struck by the economic depression that followed the American Revolution, petitioned the state senate to issue paper money and to halt foreclosure of mortgages on their property and their own imprisonment for debt as a result of high land taxes.
David Trowbridge was in the Amherst Company of the Militia under Captain Moses Cook and served in the defense of the Government of Springfield for seven days in September 1786 during the Shay's Rebellion. The rebellion was an armed insurrection by farmers against the state government. Debt-ridden farmers, struck by the economic depression that followed the American Revolution, petitioned the state senate to issue paper money and to halt foreclosure of mortgages on their property and their own imprisonment for debt as a result of high land taxes.
 
Trowbridge family must have lived in Deerfield, Mass. Their last child, Emily Trowbridge, was born at Deerfield in March 1793.
 
The Trowbridge family moved to Albany, N. about 1796, where David was an innkeeper. Eunice Trowbridge was nineteen when her family moved to Albany. At the time Joseph L. Herkimer was a law student at Albany. Eunice Trowbridge will marry Joseph Herkimer in 1800.
 
The David and Sara (Woodbridge) Trowbridge later moved to Utica, N.Y. where David was a hotelkeeper. They returned to Albany in 1806 to live. David Trowbridge, died at Little Falls, N.Y. on 16 September 1816, while visiting his daughter, Eunice. Sarah (Woodbridge) Trowbridge, died at Albany, N.Y. on 24 October 1826.

Belding Ancestors

William Belding was born about 1622 in Staffordshire England. On the early records of Wethersfield, CT, the surname was originally spelled Baylden until 1641, when the name appeared as - Beldon. In 1643, the spelling changed to Belding, and in 1736, back to Beldon. From 1753 to 1825, it was spelled - Belding and now is found as Belden.
 
William  came to New England with his father, Richard Belden, about 1635.  Richard was among the early settlers of Wethersfield, CT, which was situated on the west bank of the Connecticut River about 3 1/2 miles south of Hartford. The exact date of his settlement there is not known, but his name first appears in the town records of Hartford in 1641 as owning eight tracts of land. He was granted land at Wethersfield and also purchased additional land. He built his house there, on a three acre parcel.
 
March 1646, Richard Belding was appointed as Town Herder in charge  of the cows, which pastured on common lands at Wethersfield. Richard and his brother, John, were admitted as Freeman in 1657. Richard Belding deeded a farm to his son, Samuel, in October 1654. Richard died about 1655 at Wethersfield leaving a very large estate that was inventoried on 22 August 1655. There is no record of his wife, who died at England.
 
William Belding's brother, Samuel, married 1st about 1654 to Mary Beardslay who was killed by Indians in 1677. He married 2nd in 1678 to Mary Welles, and 3rd to Mary Allis, and 4th in 1705 to Sarah Wells. William Belding was the eldest son of Richard. Like his father, he served as one of the herders of the town, being appointed in 1648. William Belding married at Wethersfield, about 1646, to Thomasine Sherwood, whose father may have been Thomas Sherwood of Fairfield, CT. William and Thomasine (Sherwood) Belding moved to Norwalk, CT in 1646. They had six children between 1647 and 1654.
 
Daniel Belding was born, at Wethersfield, CT, on 20 November 1648. Daniel Belding grew up at Wethersfield with his three brothers and two sisters. William Belding died at Wethersfield on 27 March 1655, and his inventory was taken on 1 June 1655. Daniel Belding was only eight years old at the time. Daniel Belding married at Wethersfield on 10 November 1670 to Elizabeth Foote. She was born to Nathaniel Foote Jr and Elizabeth Smith at Hadley, Mass. in 1654. Elizabeth was only sixteen when she married. Daniel was twenty-two.
Daniel and Elizabeth (Foote) Belding first settled in Hartford, CT In 1671, Daniel and Elizabeth Belding moved from Hartford, CT to Hatfield, Mass. Daniel took the Oath of Freeman, at Hatfield, on 8 February 1679.
 
Daniel and Elizabeth Belding had nine children while living at Hatfield. William was born on 26 December 1671. Elizabeth was born on 8 October 1673. Nathaniel was born on 26 January 1675. Mary Belding - our ancestor was born at Hatfield in November 1677. Young Daniel was born on 1 September 1680. Sarah was born on 15 March 1682. Hester was born on 29 September 1683, and Abigail was born on 10 April 1686, and died 25 June 1686.
 
About 1686 Daniel, Elizabeth Belding and their eight children moved to Deerfield. Their oldest child was fifteen and their youngest was only three. Mary Belding was nine years old when they moved to Deerfield. Elizabeth gave birth five more children. Samuel was born in April 1687, John was born in June 1689 and died the next day. Abigail, named after the daughter who died, was born in August 1690. John, named after the son who died, was born in February 1693. Last but not least [indicated by the name] Thankful was born 31 December 1695.
 
The Beldings with their surviving eleven children lived a rather peaceful life at Deerfield. Homes with unpainted clapboards, narrow, unshuttered windows, and dignified doorways lines the mile-long street reflected life on the frontier 75 miles west of Boston.
 
During King William's War hostilities broke out in America between the English and French and between the Iroquois Indians and the French in the area from the Mohawk to the St. Lawrence. The French struck with their Indian allies along the northern frontier with raids in New Hempshire, New York and Massachusetts.
 
On 26 September 1696, his wife and three of his children were killed by French Mohawk Indians. Young Daniel was sixteen, John was three and Thankful was one year old when they were killed by the Indians. Daniel Belding and three other children (Elizabeth age 23, Nathaniel age 21 and Hester age 13) were captured and taken to Canada. Somehow the other children [William, Richard, Mary, Sarah, and Samuel] escaped. William and Richard were thirty-something; Mary was nineteen; Sarah was fourteen and Samuel was nine years old. Apparently Mary Belding  left Deerfield after the 1696 Indian raid.  It is not known where the surving  children went after the Indian raid .  Mary Belding married at Wilton, CT, on 19 April 1698 to James Trowbridge (as his third wife).
 
 
Daniel Belding and his three children were held captive in Canada until they were released in 1698. They returned to Deerfield to pick up their lives. Daniel married again, on 17 February 1699, to Hepzibah Buel (widow of Lt. Thomas Wells), who was born in 1649 to William Buel. His son, William, married in 1700 to Margaret Armes. His daughter, Sarah, married in 1702 to Benjamin Burt. Little did they know they were about to face another Indian raid - "Deerfield - a massacre in the wilderness".
 
"An ox sledge creaked under the last load of the wood, women served supper from the glowing hearths, and by nine o'clock Deerfield's 290 settlers were abed on the cold bitter night of February 28, 1704. Toward dawn the sentinel dozed at his post."
 
 
"Stealthily a horde of Abenakis, Caghnawagas, and French Canadians crept over drifted snow and dropped inside the palisade. Shrieking hideously, they fell upon settlers in their beds. ... Torches fired 17 houses. Leaping flames sent a vivid message, and mounted men from other Connecticut Valley settlements finally routed the attackers."
 
"They say the moon was red over Deerfield the night of the slaughter. The Massachusetts village left a smoking ruin with half its inhabitants killed or dragged off to the north. Deerfield's wretched survivors refused to abandon their wilderness outpost, and a farm village rose again, prospering from the rich soil." - America's History Lands
 
Daniel's second wife was captured by the Indians on 29 February 1704 and was killed enroute to Canada. His daughter, Sarah, was captured by the Indians in 1704. Daniel married a third time to Sarah Hawkes, the daughter of John Hawkes and the widow of Philip Mattoon.
 
Daniel Belding died at Greenfield (or Deerfield), Mass., on 14 August 1732 and Sarah on 17 September 1751

INDIAN ATTACK ON DEERFIELD  1696

About 1686 the Beldings moved to Deerfield, Mass. It was in the 1696 Massacre at Deerfield that Elizabeth (Foote) Belding and three of her children were killed by French Mohawk Indians. Daniel Beldings, his son and two daughters were taken captive.
 
 
Some of the details of this event differ, depending on the account. The best source I have found is Captive Histories, edited by Evan Haefeli and Kevin Sweeney, U of Massachusetts Press, 2006, which contains an edited version of Stephen William's account of Daniel Belding's capture, pages 54-62. Note the spelling of Belding is Belden, which are interchangeable in history records.
 
The Indians attacked Deerfield on 6 September 1696.  They encountered two Englishmen in the woods; one was able to run away and hid; the other (John Gillette), was captured. The first home they came to was the Belden (or Belding) residence. It was not far from the center of town, where a pallisade (called the fort) had been errected around ten houses.
 
Elizabeth Foote (1654-1696), the mother, and 8 Belden children died, were captured, or were wounded: the following children were at home during that time: Nathanlel, Daniel, Sarah, Hester (Esther), Samuel, Abigail (1690), John, and Thankful. Nathaniel (age 21) was captured; Daniel (age 16) was killed; Sarah (age 14) escaped capture by hiding in a tobacco chamber (one account says she was killed, but she survived to marry some years later); Hester (age 13) was taken captive;  Samuel (age 9), resisted by kicking and scratching and was severely wounded with a hatchet to his head but survived; Abigail (age 6) was wounded with a gun shot to the arm, supposed to have come from the "fort" where she was running for shelter, but survived; John (age 3) was killed; and Thankful (less than a year old) was killed.
 
Daniel, Sr. was taken captive with Nathaniel, and Hester; they were taken to Canada. On the way, their party attacked enemy Indians, and one was captured but later escaped. Belding asked the captured Indian what he thought would become of them; he replied that some would be given to the French and some would be kept.
 
When they reached the Mohawk village of Kahnawake on the St. Lawrence River, the male prisoners were forced to "run the gauntlet," and Belding, "being a very nimble or light-footed man, received but a few blows, save at first setting out, but the other two [men] were much abused by clubs, firebrands, and so forth" (58).
 
On Oct. 9, Nathaniel and Gilette were given to the French; Nathaniel was put with the Holy Sisters of St. Joseph at a hopsital (Hotel-Dieu de Montreal). Daniel was sold a year later (9 July 1687) to be a servant in Montreal to the priests at a seminary (mis-reported in one account as Jesuits, but they were the Congregation of Saint Suplice). He reported that he waited on them, cut wood, and worked the garden, and that he was well-treated.
 
In April of 1698, Peter Schuyler and Colonel Abraham Schuyler and some others including a Dutch official from New York came to Canada and won from the French govenor the release of all captives. All those over sixteen were to return home and all those under sixteen were allowed to decide whether to stay or leave.
 
Belden and his son and his daughter and about 20 others were taken to Albany and given hospitality by the Dutch who lived there. His brother John (Norwalk, CT) sent money for them to get new clothes. The Dutch offered to send the family directly back to Deerfield, but after a 3-week stay in Albany they chose to go to New York to a place provided by his brother, and from there they took a boat to Stamford, then Norwalk, where they stayed a while before returning to Deerfield. 
 
 It is not clear why Mary (age 19) is never mentioned as she was not yet married. 
 
http://www.members.tripod.com/~Silvie/Belden.html)From the Pane-Joyce Genealogy
Aniother account from Stephen William's manuscript in Sheldon's History of Deerfield. Southworth Press, Portland,
 
. "On Sept. 16, 1696, a band of Mohawk Indians attacked the settlement of Deerfield while the people were at religious service. Mr. Belding lived a short distance outside the fort, and had just returned from the fields to attend the services. While he remained in his house for a short time, with his children around him, the Indians rushed upon them and took him prisoner, together with his son Nathaniel, aged 22 years, and his daughter Hester, aged 13 and massacred his wife, sons Daniel and John, and daughter Thankful, and also left his son Samuel for dead, but he afterwards recovered.
 Two other daughters, Abigail and Sarah, escaped to the fort.
Sarah 'hid herself among some tobacco in ye chamber & and so escap'd.'

The Indians started back to Canada. On the way they fought with a band of Albany Indians and acquired some more prisoners. They finally arrived on Oct. 9 at a fort named Oso, and then all the male prisoners were forced to run the gauntlet where the prisoners passed between a double line of Indians who administered as many blows as possible with clubs and firebrands. Mr. Belding and his son were very light footed and escaped with comparatively few blows. The Indians kept Mr. Belding and his daughter Hester with them as servants.
- -
On the 9th of July he was sold to the French and he lived as a servant for the Jesuits at the seminary; his business was to wait on them, cut wood, make fires & tend to the garden. He accounted himself favorably dealt with. After the English and French signed a treaty, they were redeemed from Canada (1698) by Peter and Abraham Schuyler and returned to Albany the following June 8th. They were maintained in Albany until brother John of Norwalk paid their debts and took them to Norwalk. His brother John arranged for his return from Albany to New York and then to Deerfield. Daniel returned permanently to Deerfield. His second wife was widow of Lieutenant Thomas Wells. She was taken in the Februray 29, 1704, Deerfield raid and killed en route to Canada. There is a memorial to Daniel Belden in the Historic Museum in Deerfield MA  from "New England Captives Carried to Canada Between 1677 and 1760, During the French and Indian Wars," by Emma Lewis Coleman, Vol. II, Southworth Press, Portland, Maine, 1925
- -

Daniel remarried, and his second wife was captured in 1704 and killed on the journey to Canada. Daniel rebuilt his home, and later fought off, with other fellow townsmen, in 1709, another attack by the French and Indians. He married a third wife who outlived him.
 
Another account from the Hatfield Town Records:

        “Elizabeth, wife to Daniel Beldenye head of the family, together with Daniel Belden, John Belden and Thankful Belden, their ehidren, were all of them slaine by the enemie September 16, 1696.”

        “Sept. 16, 1696. The Indians came along from up Green Biver to the town, and assaulted Mr. Daniel Belden’s house; took Mr. Belden, his son Nathaniel and daughter Esther captive, killed his wife and three ehildren, and wounded Samuel and Abigail, but they recovered, altho’ Samuel had a hatchet stuck in his head, and some of his brains came out at his wound. Samuel was born Apr. 10, 1687.”
From Mather's Magnalia:

    “The Indians making an Assault upon Deerfield, in this Present War, they struck a Hatchet some Inches into the Skull of a Boy there, even so deep that the Boy felt the force of a Wrench used by ‘em to get it out.
 
There he lay a long while Weltering in his Blood; they found him, they Dress’d him; considerable Quantities of his Brain came out from time to time when they opened the Wound, yet the Lad recovered, and is now a Iiving Monument of the Power and Goodness of God.”

Foote Ancestors

Nathaniel Foote 1592- 1599/1600
 
Nathaniel Foote was born September 21, 1592 in Shalford Colchester Esses, England. He was the son of Robert Foote. Nathaniel Foote was fifteen years old when his father died in 1608; Robert Jr, thus became the head of the house.
 
At the age of sixteen Nathaniel was apprenticed on 21 September, 1608 for a term of 8 years or until his 24th birthday in the year 1616, to Samuel Croyle of Colchester, a grocer and free burgess. [A wholesale merchant, or as often called in those days "a grosser," was one who sold by the gross instead of by the pound or small quantity.
 
A short time after he finished his apprenticeship training, he married Elizabeth Deming (In January of the year 1616) in Colchester, Essex, England. She was the sister of John Deeming, who was for many years the one of the magistrates of the "Colony of the Connecticut" and one of the Patenees named in its charter. She was the daughter of Jonathan Deming (411) (ca 1574- ) & Elizabeth Gilbert, in Colchester, Essex, Eng. Born in Oct 1595 in Shalford, Essex. . They had six children born in England. Nathaniel Foote Jr. was born in England about 1620.
 
Sometime before the year 1633 the family moved from London England to Boston, Massachusetts. He settled first, upon arrival in the New World, at Watertown, Mass.; where he took the freeman's oath 3 Sep 1633. The Foote family settled at Watertown, Mass. on 16 acres of land which they received as a grant. Nathaniel Foote Jr. was about fourteen when his mother gave birth to his youngest sister, Rebecca, at Watertown about 1634.
 
A short time after arriving in Wethersfield in 1635, Nathaniel received a ten acre house lot on the east side of Broad Street. This land was near the south end of the street. This land was purchased directly from the Wongunk Indians at a place located along the Connecticut River that was called Pyguaq, later renamed Wethersfield.
 
In 1635, Nathaniel Foote Sr. and John Strickland, and their families, ventured out from Watertown and were among the first settlers on the bank of the Connecticut River, at Pyquag, CT (known as Wethersfield for an English village of the same name). This is the same John Strickland whose daughter married John Jackson who is a Greene ancestor. Nathaniel Foote had 10 acres of land at Wethersfield.
 
Even though Nathaniel's main profession in England was that of a grocer, he became a farmer. He was also active in the public trusts of the town. He was appointed as a delegate to the "General Court" in the year 1644.
 
Later the Footes moved to Hartford, CT where in 1640, Nathaniel's father was assigned a house lot of 10 acres. In addition, he owned several other tracts of land at Hartford, amounting to over 400 acres. He was a farmer and a Deputy to the General Court of Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1641, 1643 and 1644. Nathaniel Foote Sr. was a very pious and industrious farmer, besides being one of the richest landowners of his day.
 
Additionally, he became the owner of several other tracts laying in part in the great meadow east of his house and containing close to 400 acres of land. In 1641, he was appointed a delegate to the General Court. He was a juror in 1643 and 1644.
 
The family was saddened by Nathaniel's death at age 51. Records show that Nathaniel Foote died in Wethersfield, Connecticut in November, 1644. He was buried in the burying ground in the rear of the town meeting house, where nine generations are buried. Nathaniel was survived by his wife, two sons, and five daughters.
 
      Elizabeth Foote (16 Jan 1617-8 Sep 1700)
      Nathaniel Foote Jr (ca 1619-1655)
      Mary Foote (ca 1622-)
      Lieut. Robert Foote 8 Dec 1627-1681)
      Frances Foote (ca 1629-ca 1681)
      Sarah Foote (ca 1632-1673)
      Rebecca Foote (ca 1634-6 Apr 1701)
 
Nathaniel Foote was one of those named in the charter of patentees of Wethersfield. The Foote family became one of the leading families of the little Connecticut Colony. He became a magistrate, a leading land owner, eventually owning more than 500 acres of land in Wethersfield, some of the great meadow, and his home on the south end of the green, next to the present Broad Street
 
 
Elizabeth was so respected that she was allowed to be executor of his estate. Elizabeth was left a wealthy widow, but did not remain in that status for long. In 1646 she married Thomas Wells who was a widower with several children from his first marriage. Thomas Wells served as Governor of Connecticut Colony for two terms, 1655-1658. When he was not serving as governor he was a Deputy Governor. He died during his last years of being deputy governor, 14 January 1659/1660.  Elizabeth died between 16 Aug 1682 and 3 Sep 1683 in Wethersfield, CT.
 
http://www.footefamily.org/nathno1a.htm
 
Nathaniel Foote Jr (ca 1619-1655)
 
Nathaniel was the oldest son of Nathaniel and Elizabeth (Demming) Foote.  He was one of seven children. Nathaniel was twenty-four and his youngest sister, Rebecca, was only eleven. Mary had married in 1642 at the age of nineteen. Nathaniel Foote Jr.'s mother remarried in 1646 at Wethersfield, to Governor Thomas Welles. She died at Wethersfield on 28 July 1683.
 
At the age of twenty-six, Nathaniel Jr married Elizabeth Smith in 1646. She was the daughter of Lt. Samuel Smith of Wethersfield, CT and Hadley, Mass. Elizabeth Smith was seven years old when her family sailed from England to Boston, Mass.
 
After Nathaniel Jr and Elizabeth married and lived in Wethersfield, CT where Nathaniel inherited a three acre home lot at his father's death in 1644 plus several more acres of land. After Nathaniel's death at a young age, Elizabeth married William Gull and they had four daughters together. At some point they moved up the Connecticut River to Hadley, where Elizabeth's parents lived.
 
In 1646, Nathaniel and Elizabeth (Smith) Foote moved to Hadley. Nathaniel and Elizabeth had four children. Their first child, Nathaniel III, was born on 10 January 1648. Samuel [named after his maternal grandfather] was born on 1 May 1649. Daniel Foote was born in 1652 and Elizabeth Foote was born in 1654. The internet claims (1) the children were born at Hadley except Daniel, who was born at Wethersfield or (2) all were born at Wetherfield. The family did live in Wethersfield June 1655. Both Daniel and Elizabeth lives are intertwined in our ancestral history.
 
 
Nathanial Foote Jr, died at Wethersfield after 7 June 1655, the date of his will, and before 23 September 1655, when his inventory was taken. The four Foote children ranged in ages from seven to one year old. Little Elizabeth was only one year old. Her mother remarried to William Gull of Wethersfield and had four children by him. Elizabeth (Smith) (Foote) Gull died on 16 December 1668. Daniel was sixteen years old and Elizabeth was fourteen years old. They remained in Wethersfield with their siblings, step-father and four half-sisters/brothers.On 10 November 1670 Elizabeth Foote married Daniel Belding at Wethersfield. The Beldings were longtime residents of Wethersfield. Elizabeth was only sixteen when she married. Daniel Belding was twenty-two. Their daughter, Mary Belding will marry James Trowbridge.
 
Daniel Foote married a young woman named Sarah Chapin. They lived at Stratford CT.  Daniel and Sarah Foote had eight children. Their first daughter, Hannah Foote, was born at Stratford CT on 13 February 1683/4. Abigail. She had two older brothers and two younger sister and a younger brother.
 
About 1686 the Beldings moved to Deerfield, Mass. It was in the 1696 Massacre at Deerfield that Daniel’s sister, Elizabeth (Foote) Belding and three of her children were killed by French Mohawk Indians. Her husband, one son and a daughter were captured and taken to Canada. Four of her children survived the massacre.  Did Daniel rush to Deerfield, a hundred miles away, to rescue his nieces and nephews or did they find their way to savety?
 
Hannah married Richard Beach in December 1704.
 
Hannah’s mother died in 1752 in Fairfield CT and her father remarried . Some say “Mary-“, others say  on 8 Sep 1723 when Daniel was 71, he married Abigail (Allen) Shepard. Abigail died on 19 Dec 1755 in Newtown, CT.  They had three children (this has not been verified)

Comstock Ancestors

Mary Comstock married John Trowbridge. Mary's great-grandfather, Christopher Comstock was born at England about 1635 to William Comstock and Elizabeth Daniels. Christopher was the next to youngest of six children. William Comstock and his son, Christopher, came to Weymouth, Mass., about 1637 and settled at Watertown, Mass.. He was first recorded in Wethersfield, CT in 1641. It is uncertain if his wife and other children came at the same time or followed later.
 
During the time of the first English settlement the Pequot Indians were busy conquering their weaker Indian neighbors. By the middle of the 1630s their great sachem, Sassacus, ruled over more than two dozen subchiefs and claimed most of Connecticut and Long Island. Being on the border between Dutch and English, Sassacus had played shifty politics with both, growing more and more arrogant and independent. In 1636 Massachusetts Bay Puritans sent a force to smite the Indian nation that had become the strongest in New England - the Pequots. The Massachusetts Bay Puritans, massacred a village and having declared war the Puritans went back home. The English settlements in Connecticut and at Plymouth were dragged into the war by the precipitated action of the Massachusetts Puritans.
 
In June 1637 the English army made a stealthy night attack on a stockade Pequot town near the Mystic River. They burned the town and slaughtered the 600 inhabitants. The only other engagement in the war was the surrender of a crowd of Pequots trapped in a swamp; the adult male captives were killed, boys sold to the West Indies, women and girls parceled out among the colonists as slaves.
 
William Comstock, was one of 26 men from Wethersfield, under Captain John Mason, who captured the Pequot Fort at Mystic, CT on 26 May 1637, killing more than 500 Indians. William Comstock owned land on the Connecticut River, which he purchased from Richard Miles in April 1641. On 21 June 1647, he purchased ten more acres of land from Richard Miles, and settled there on the east side of the Thames River, at Piquot (now New London, CT). This was where Christopher Comstock spent his childhood.
 
 
When Christopher Comstock was about fifteen his father, William Comstock, entered into an agreement with John Winthrop, to build a corn mill at New London, CT (now Montville) and settled there in 1651. William Comstock died about 1663 at New London, and Elizabeth died sometime after 1665.
 
In 1661, Christopher Comstock lived at Norwalk, CT and married Hannah Platton 6 October 1663  . Hannah was born in 1643. Her father was Richard Platt, who was born in England in 1603. His father and grandfather were both tailors at Ware, Hertfordshire, England. Richard Platt apprenticed as a tailor and was a Puritan. He sold his home, at Ware, on 25 April 1638 and moved his family to London, temporarily for several months, while awaiting passage to New England. Richard Platt, his wife and their four children sailed to America in the latter half of 1638 or early 1639. Their oldest was about ten years old and their youngest was a baby.
The Platts lived in New Haven, CT On 22 August 1639, Richard Platt was one of 66 men, who formed themselves into a church society, at New Haven, under the leadership of Rev. Peter Prudden. He was listed there as a Free Planter on 20 November 1639. In the Spring of 1640, this same group of men moved their families nine miles to the west and founded the plantation of Milford, CT. Richard and his family, of four, were enrolled among Milford's first settlers.
 
The first five Platt children were born at England, while the other four at Milford. Richard Platt was admitted as a Freeman there before 1669. He was a deeply religious man, of high character, who was chosen as a deacon in the first church at Milford, in 1669. Hannah's mother was buried at Milford on 24 March 1676, and her father, Richard Platt, died there in the winter of 1684/85.
Hannah and Christopher Comstock first lived at Fairfield, CT (as early as 1653). About 1662, they moved to Norwalk, where he was an innkeeper. Christopher Comstock was nominated for Freeman of the Connecticut Colony on 10 October 1667. He served as a Deputy from Norwalk to the Connecticut General Assembly, from 1686 to 1690. Christopher was sometimes known by "Sergeant" Comstock, and was nominated for a Freeman of Norwalk, CT on 10 October 1667. He was a Deputy for Norwalk to the General Court on 16 January 1686, and again in 1689 and 1690. He kept a tavern at Norwalk in 1671, and left a large estate when he died there in 1702. Hannah died at Milford sometime after 1713.
 
Christopher was sometimes known by "Sergeant" Comstock, and was nominated for a Freeman of Norwalk, CT on 10 October 1667. He was a Deputy for Norwalk to the General Court on 16 January 1686, and again in 1689 and 1690. He kept a tavern at Norwalk in 1671, and left a large estate when he died there in 1702. Hannah died at Milford sometime after 1713.
 
Christopher and Hannah Comstock had eight children between 1664 and 1685 all born at Norwalk, CT.  Samuel Comstock was born at Norwalk, Ct in February 1680.  Samual grew up with his five older sister, his older brother and younger brother at Norwalk where his father ran a tavern. Samuel married at Norwalk in 1705 to Sarah Hanford. She was the daughter of Rev. Thomas Hanford and Mary Miles. Samuel and Sarah Comstock first resided at Norwalk.
 
Samuel  was a Deputy to the General Court from 1711 to 1738. He was an Ensign of South Company of Norwalk in 1710, a Lieutenant in 1719, and a Captain in 1730. He died on 26 October 1752 at East Norwalk and is buried at the old East Norwalk Cemetery.
 
Sarah and Samuel Comstock had seven children, who were all born at Norwalk. Sarah was born 1707,and Samuel was born on  1708. Mary Comstock was born in 1710 and married about 1735 to John Trowbridge. Deacon Nathan was born about 1713, and married in 1739 to Bethiah Strong. Lydia and Daniel were born about 1720, and David was born in 1720.
Mary Comstock grew up in Norwalk with her older brother and sister, younger three brothers and younger sister. Her younger sister, Lydia may have died as a baby since there are no know dates for her. Her younger brothers were both ten years younger than she. Mary Comstock was married at Norwalk, about 1735, to John Trowbridge. He was born in 1709 to James Trowbridge and Mary Beldon.
Mary (Comstock) and John Trowbridge lived at Norwalk until 1749, when they moved to Danbury, CT. John Trowbridge served in the French and Indian War during 1755. Their farm was located just west of Danbury, where Revolutionary soldiers were quartered. John died at Danbury in May 1777 and Mary sometime later. They had eight children, including our ancestor - David Trowbridge. who married in 1770 to Sarah Woodbridge.

Hanford Ancestors

Thomas Hanford was born, at Devonshire, England, on 22 July 1621. His father was Jeffery Hanford who born about 1589. His mother was Eglin Hatherly, who was born in Fremington, Devonshire, England. His mother's brother, Rev. Timothy Hatherly, came to Plymouth in 1636 and was a founder of Scituate Mass. Thomas' father died sometime before 10 April 1635. That was the date that Thomas' mother and two sisters - Margaret and Elizabeth, sailed from Sudbury, England, aboard the ship - "Planter” that was bound for New England. Thomas Hanford remained in England in order to study for the ministry. About 1642, persecution of Puritan clergymen forced him to leave Devonshire, for Boston.
 
Thomas Hanford settled at Scituate, Mass. in 1643. He was a teacher at Roxbury, Mass., where he was made a Freeman of Massachusetts in May 1650. In 1651, he was a teacher at New Haven, CT, and was first married, in 1652, to Hannah Newberry of Dorchester, Mass... She was born about 1633 and was the daughter of Thomas and Jane Newberry. Hannah's father died in 1635 and her mother remarried Rev. John Warham. In the summer of 1652, Thomas and Hannah Hanford moved to Norwalk, CT, where Thomas was granted 4 acres of land and he commenced the work of the ministry. On 18 May 1654, Thomas Hanford was made a Freeman of Connecticut. He was ordained in 1654, and was the first minister in the Congregational Church of Norwalk. Hannah died about 1660, leaving no children.
 
 
Rev. Thomas Hanford married again, at New Haven on 22 October 1661, to Mary Miles, the widow of Jonathan Ince of New Haven. She was born about 1635 to Hon. Richard Miles of New Haven. Mary had a five year old son, Jonathan. Little did Jonathan know he was going to become the oldest of eleven children.
Rev. Thomas Hanford and his new wife and son moved to Norwalk, CT Norwalk was one of the new towns that joined the Connecticut Colony in 1660. Other towns that joined were Fairfield, Farmington, Middletown, New London, Saybrook and Stratford. The Connecticut Colony received a charter from England, which served as Connecticut's constitution until 1818. Mary Miles (Ince) Hanford had ten children between 1662 and 1678, all born at Norwalk, CT: Theophilus, Mary, Hannah, Elizabeth, Thomas, Eleazur, Elanthan, Samuel, Eunice, and Sarah. Sarah Hanford was born in May 1678 and was the youngest of eleven children. 
 
On 8 October 1674 Thomas received a grant of 200 acres of land at Hartford, CT and in 1686, he was a patentee of Norwalk. He was held in high regard by the Indians, who gave him even more land. Rev. Thomas continued his work in the ministry at Norwalk until his death, in December 1693. Mary died on 12 September 1730.
 
Sarah Hanford married Samuel Comstock at Norwalk on 27 December 1705 to. Samuel Comstock was a Deputy to the General Court from 1711 to 1738. He was an Ensign of South Company of Norwalk in 1710, a Lieutenant in 1719, and a Captain in 1730.
 
Sarah and Samuel Comstock had seven children, who were all born at Norwalk. Sarah was born 25 March 1707, and Samuel was born on 12 November 1708. Mary Comstock was born in 1710. Deacon Nathan was born about 1713, and married in 1739 to Bethiah Strong. Lydia and Daniel were born about 1720, and David was born in 1720.
 
Mary Comstock married John Trowbridge about 1735.