John Greene 1606-1695

In the period for 1630 to 1640, that of the great Puritan Migration into Massachusetts, several men by the name of Greene came to the colonies, most of them settling in New England. Of all these, two of them are of particular interest to us. Both of their names were John, and their wives names were Joan. They were second cousins-german, that is, one was the second cousin of the other's father. The elder of these John Greenes settled in Warwick, Rhode Island, after a short sojourn in Massachusetts. The other John Greene, who is our ancestor, is often spoken of as John of Quidnessett.
 
 
John Greene was born in England in 1606. As a young man, in 1635, he migrated, sailing on the ship, Matthew, to the West Indies, where he stayed for a few months. Finding the people there a "Godless set", he sailed to Massachusetts, the great Puritan settlement. Differing with the religious authorities there, he accompanied Richard Smith to Narragansett Bay where the latter had a trading post at Quidnessett, or Aquidneset. The two together established a flourishing trade with the Indians. For some years, Smith and Greene were the only white settlers at Quidnessett.
 
John's wife was a young widow, Mrs. Joan Beggarly, whom he married on one of his business trips to Massachusetts around 1642. a remarkably even, sweet temper that nothing could ruffle or disturb. After the English custom, she had been baptized Joan but was always called Jane. There is an old family superstition among the Quidnessett Greenes that all their Janes will be self-sacrificing women who will take special care of the sick and care for the old and infirm. John Greene and his wife, Joan Beggerly (Beggarly) raised at least ten children between 1643 and 1665.
 
In 1656, Richard Smith negotiated with the Indian Sachems to purchase the island of Conanicut (Jamestown). Edward Greene was fourteen at the time and helped his father clear the land. In 1657, John Greene received 1/40 of a share in the island, adjacent to those lands of Smith. John was the first to improve his land there.
 
Prior to 11 June 1659, the Quidnessett region was still Indian territory. On that date, Indian Sachem, Coquinisquant, on behalf of the Narragansett Indians, sold the region of Quidnessett to a company of land speculators, who were headed up by Major Humphrey Atherton. John Greene was not a member of the early company, but became an early stockholder. In 1661, John Greene sold his share of the Conanicut (Jamestown) purchase in order to develop his land at Quidnessett. John Greene became known as "John Greene of Quidnessett .
 
On June 11, 1659 the Indian Sachem, Coquinaquant, sold the entire region of Quidnessett, which had belonged to the Narragansett Indians, to a land company headed by Major Humphrey Atherton. There were few Rhode Islanders in the company but Richard Smith was among them, the rest being Boston and Connecticut speculators.
 
At the time of the above purchase, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut each claimed this Indian territory. Rhode Island had already passed a law forbidding the purchase of land from the Indians without the consent of the Colony of Rhode Island. As a result, the purchasers of Quidnessett were told that they had to repurchase their property from Rhode Island, or Rhode Island would not acknowledge their claims to the land. Furthermore, if they claimed allegiance to Connecticut Rhode Island would confiscate their property. The result was that the settlers banded together and declared for Connecticut, which made Rhode Island their enemy

John Greene was one of the early shareholders but not one of the original ones. In 1651, the southern towns formed a separate government. A liberal charter for the entire area was obtained from King Charles II. In 1651 John Greene, purchased 80 acres in this area. In the same year, he purchased another 100 acres in Narragansett, near Allen's Harbor; he did not build on this land until 1661.
 
John Greene became the leader of the Atherton land purchasers when trouble came up concerning the title to the land. The reason for the dispute is not clear, but the settlers were told that there was a Rhode Island law forbidding settlers to buy lands from the Indians, and that they must rebuy their homes from the Rhode Island colony. Connecticut and Massachusetts also claimed the same land.
In 1663 John Greene, Richard Smith, and others [including Henry Tibbits] petitioned to be under the Connecticut jurisdiction. This made the Rhode Island officials angry, and Greene was ordered arrested. He did not go peacefully, and when he arrived in Newport, he stood his ground so sturdily that the authorities came to some terms and he was released on the promise that he would be from that time on a "loyal freeman of Rhode Island". He was "loyal" until he could reach home. The fight between John Greene and Rhode Island went on for seven years more, and Rhode Island finally gave in, May 1671. A special court was held at that time at Aquidneset, and Greene and his followers were assured full possession of their lands if they would acknowledge Rhode Island's jurisdiction, so on May 20, 1671, John Greene and his son, Daniel, became "freemen" of Rhode Island and the dispute was at an end.
 
In January 1672, John Greene along with John Fones, Henry Tibbitts, and four others, bought a large tract of land in Narragansett (known as the Devil's Foot) from Awashuwett, the chief Sachem of the Narragansett Indians. This tract later became known as the Fones Purchase and on 31 October 1677, these 5,000 acres were set aside for a town to be incorporated as East Greenwich. In July 1679, ten-acre town lots and ninety acre farm lots were drawn. John Greene drew the ninth house lot and the third farm lot.
 
Several times after this, John Greene's name appears on the records as witness to the transfer of land, etc. March 23, 1682, he divided his land among some of his sons who remained in Rhode Island, some of them having gone to New Jersey. John Greene's wife was alive when these deeds were executed. John Greene is believed to have lived with his son, John, at Coventry from the time of his wife's death until his own in 1695 and was buried in the Old Field Graveyard, a mile west of the Maple Root Church.
Edward Greene  1643-1717
Edward Greene, the eldest son of John Greene, was born about 1643 at Quidnessett, R.I. On 3 July 1663, John Greene, Richard Smith, and Henry Tibbitts petitioned to be under Connecticut jurisdiction. Rhode Island then arrested John Greene, taking him to Newport to answer for these actions. Edward Greene was twenty years old at this time. Being the eldest of eleven children, Edward had to assume the role of head of the family.

Tradition claims that about 1670, Edward Greene and his younger brothers, John Jr. and Robert, had a dispute with their father and left Rhode Island to go to New York. Some say Robert went to New Jersey, while others say to Virginia. John Jr. apparently returned to R.I. sometime after 1684. Edward Greene left for a period of twenty-five years while his parents remained in Rhode Island.

About 1675, Edward Greene married Mary Tibbitts. Mary Tibbitts was sometimes called "Sarah". Mary Tibbitts was born in 1660 and the fifth child of Henry and Sarah (Stanton) Tibbitts. The Stantons came to New England between 1627 and 1638. They were settlers at Pocasset (Portsmouth, R.I.) where Sarah's father, Robert Stanton, signed the "Compact of Portsmouth" in 1638. Records show the Stantons as living on the Island of Aquidneck in 1638, and moved to Newport R.I. some time before 1645. Sarah Stanton was born in 1640 at Portsmouth, R.I. Robert Stanton was a quiet and steady going person and probably a Quaker or Quaker sympathizer, as he was ostracized. The religious intolerance of Massachusetts was probably what caused him to move to a liberal Rhode Island. Henry Tibbitt's family emigrated from Warwickshire, England and settled near Kingston, Rhode Island about 1660. Henry Tibbits was about thirty years old at the time when he married Sarah Stanton.
 
First Edward and Sarah lived in Connecticut and then Suffolk County, L.I. They lived in Charlotte Precinct, Dutchess County, N.Y. before returning to Kingstown R.I. Edward and Mary Greene had six children between 1675 and 1680. William Greene was the third child and the second son born to Edward and Mary.
 
In 1682 Edward’s father, John Greene, conveyed 120 acres, bordering on Allen's Harbor, to his son - Daniel and 60 acres to his son - James, who both remained in Rhode Island. Two of his other sons (Henry and Robert) and a daughter or two went to New Jersey (one may have gone to Virginia). The 100 acres in East Greenwich went to Edward Greene as stated in his will. Edward Greene was still in New York.
 
It is believed that Edward Greene got his title of "Captain" after the King Phillips's War with the Indians. His brother, John Jr. got his title of "Lieutenant" in King Phillip's War.
 
Captain Edward Greene lived in Charlotte Precinct, Dutchess County, N.Y., where several of his children remained after Edward returned to Rhode Island. Edward Greene, after twenty-five years, returned to North Kingstown R.I. about 1695 (other reports say it was 1685.
William Greene  1680-1756
William Greene was the third child and the second son born to Edward and Mary Greene. He was born about 1680 and we are not sure when he died. William was fifteen when his father, Edward Greene, returned to Rhode Island. This was the first time William Greene met his grandfather, John Greene of Quinesset.
 
William Greene married Rachel Smith at Greenwich, CT  Rachel Smith was the daughter of Nathan Smith of Greenwich. Nathan was the son of Daniel Smith who came to New England in 1638 and was one of the original 27 settlers of Greenwich, where his family became very prominent. Nathan Smith was killed in an Indian uprising.
 
After they married, William and Rachel Greene resided at Horseneck, Greenwich . William and Rachel had at least four children. William Greene Jr. was the third child and first son, who was born about 1712 at Greenwich, CT.  The Greene family moved to Sectogue (Islip Long Island, NY) sometime during William Jr.'s childhood. William Greene had became a Quaker. Many families in Islip were Quakers and Loyalists to England. Islip remains a varied, beautiful and interesting place to live. Few suburbs encompass ocean beaches, sparkling bays, a beautiful lake, vistas of forest fields, canals and ponds, historic villages and innumerable architectural treasures.
 
The date of William Greene's death is unknown although he may be the William that died on 28 January 1756 and is buried at the Barnstable Church in Mass. They had at least four children, including our ancestor - William Greene Jr.
 
 
 
William Greene Jr 1712 -1775
Willian Greene Jr. was born about 1712 in Horseneck, Greenwich, CT, He was the third child and first son of William and Rachel (Smith) Greene. At one time, a good portion of central Greenwich was known as "Horseneck".  Research indicates that the term was used as early as 1669. The Greene family moved to Sectogue (Islip Long Island, NY) sometime during William Jr.'s childhood.
 
In late 1735 William Greene Jr married Martha Jackson of Rocky Hill in Flushing, Long Island. Martha was born on 26 January 1709 to James Jackson and Rebecca Hallett. At one time William and Martha lived at Islip, L.I. They were living in Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y. prior to 1738. William was listed as a Freeholder of Suffolk County, on 27 February 1737.
 
William Jr. and Martha Greene had at least eight children all born in Suffolk County, Long Island, NY. Philip was born on 9 September 1736. Rachel was born on 11 February 1738. Augustus was born on 3 February 1740. Phoebe was born on 25 October 1742. Timothy was born on 20 April 1744. Ambrose Greene was born on 9 April 1746. Naomi was born on 25 February 1748. Ruth was born on 22 January 1752.
 
William Greene Jr died in 1775 just about the time the start of the American Revolution.
Ambrose Greene (1746-1827/1837)
Ambrose Greene was born on 9 April 1746 born in Suffolk County, Long Island, NY.. His parents, William Jr and Martha Greene had at least eight children born between 1736 and 1752. In 1766, Ambrose Greene married Gula Elma (Gulielma) Lester of Dutchess County, N.Y. who was born 6 June 1746, probably to John Lester of Dutchess County. The Lester family were loyal to the King. When the Revolutionary War started, they went back to New Brunswick, Canada, where some by that name still reside.
 
Ambrose and Gula Greene first settled at Dutchess Co. NY, where their first three children were born. Ruth was born on 30 September 1767. John Lester Greene was born on 17 April 1770 at Dutchess County. Amy was born on 23 September 1772.
 
Early in 1775 the Ambrose Greene family moved to Schodach, Rensselaer County NY where their other four children were born. Augustus Greene, Ambrose's brother, and his family had moved from Dutchess County to Rensselaer County in 1774. 
 
Delegates from every colony except Georgia met in September 1774 for the First Continental Congress in Philadelphia, where they committed themselves and their people to revolution. On April 19, 1775 seven hundred British troops, on the march since the night before toward a rebel arsenal at Concord along the way at Lexington, faced off against a small and confused rag-tag force of Massachusetts colonists calling themselves "Minutemen".  Someone fired a shot.  The British broke ranks and returned fire. Within minutes eight of the colonial militia lay dead on the village green. The American Revolution had begun. The Ambrose Greene family were now Patriots! Ambrose and his brothers served in the Revolutionary War.
 
Ambrose Greene served in the 4th Albany County Regiment under Col. Kilion Van Rensselaer. Ambrose's brother, Philip Greene, served in the 6th Regiment of New York Militia. Augustus Greene in the 7th Regiment of the New York Militia.
 
In the spring or early summer of 1795 Ambrose Green and his wife, Gula Elma Lester, moved from Schodack, Renssalaer County. They bought a farm one mile south of the Indian Castle Church, Herkimer County, NY. His family consisted of three sons and four daughters, all married . Ambrose Greene died in  1827 or 1837 at the age of 81 or 91years of age.
John Lester Greene (1770-1851)
John Lester Greene was the son of Ambrose Greene and Gulielma Lester. John was born in 1746 in Dutches County , NY. John L. Green married Ruth Barker in 1790.
John and Ruth Green and had two small children when he came from Rennselaer County. He bought the farm adjoining his father’s on the west and his family increased until there were eight sons and two daughters. He and his wife spent sixty years of married life together and fifty-five on the same farm. When the wife died 17 August, 1850 all of her ten children were at the funeral and all but two lived within three miles of the old home.
 
Lester Greene was born in 1808 at Indian Castle, Little Falls in Herkimer Co. NY. His younger brother, Zenas was born 1811. Their little sisters, Sophia was born 1814 and Mary in 1818. Lester and Zen’s were the great protectors of their little sisters.  Indian Castle appears on the Little Falls U.S. Geological Survey Map.
 
Lester and Zenas Greene, the youngest sons married Emily and Ann Herkimer, grandnieces of the brave old general. They ran the lock grocery store for several years but sold out in 1860. In 1859 Lester was sent to the legislature and after that made his home in Little Falls where he died in 1863.
 
John Lester and Ruth Greene, had spent sixty years of married life together and fifty-five on the same farm. Ruth died there in June or on 17 August 1850. In 1850 John and Ruth Greene had thirty-seven grand children. Most of them were living in the town of Danube.  John Lester Greene died on 26 December 1851 in Herkimer County, NY.. Both are buried at the Indian Castle Cemetery in Little Falls.
 
Lester Greene  1808-1863
Lester Greene was born in 1808 at Indian Castle, Little Falls in Herkimer Co. NY. His parents were John Lester and Ruth (Baker) Greene. His younger brother, Zenas was born 1811. Their little sisters, Sophia was born 1814 and Mary in 1818. Lester and Zenas were the great protectors of their little sisters.  Indian Castle appears on the Little Falls U.S. Geological Survey Map.
 
Lester and Zenas Greene  married Emily and Ann Herkimer, grandnieces of the brave old general. In February 1832 Lester Greene married Emily Amelia Herkimer by Rev. John Manley of Snells Bush Reformed Church in Danube. Emily was born on 13 June 1811 to Joseph L. Herkimer (1775-1824) and Eunice Trowbridge (1781-1826).
 
Lester and Emily Greene raised 6 children in Danube. Their children were Oliver, Alonzo, Horace and Julia.  Julia Greene was born in Danube, July 12, 1837  married, Dec. 8, 1859, Byron Beach. Horace Lester Greene was born in 1839 in his grandparents’  farmhouse at Indian Castle. Horace, our ancestor, married Anna Lydia Beach.
Lester and Zenas Greene ran the lock grocery store for several years but sold out in 1860.
The Whig Party was a political that operated from 1834-1856. Lester Greene was a Whig, an ardent abolitionist and assisted many run-away slaves on their way to Canada. He was active in the Methodist Episcopal Church and advocated temperance. He joined the Dutch Reform Church in 1859. He was instrumental in the formation of the Republican Party in his section of the State.

The Whig Party was a political that operated from 1834-1856. Lester Greene was a Whig, an ardent abolitionist and assisted many run-away slaves on their way to Canada. He was active in the Methodist Episcopal Church and advocated temperance. He joined the Dutch Reform Church in 1859. He was instrumental in the formation of the Republican Party in his section of the State.
In 1859 Lester was sent to the legislature and after that made his home in Little Falls where he died in 1863. Lester Greene was only fifty-six years old when he died.  Lester Greene was only fifty-six years old when he died in 1863. Alonzo was twenty-nine and was a widower. Horace Greene had studied law and was admitted to the bar on 9 April 1863 at Syracuse, New York.
www.herkimer.nygenweb.net/danube/danubesketch.html
Horace Lester Greene 1839-1891
Horace Lester Greene was born in 1839 in his grandparent’s  farmhouse at Indian Castle. There was a strong union between the Greene family and the Beach family. Lester and Emily Greene raised 6 children in Danube. His sister, Julia Greene, married Byron Beach in 1859.  Horace married Anna Lydia Beach in 1861. Horace's brother, Alzono Greene, married Anna's older sister, Mary Porter Beach in 1864. Alzono was a post-master, city engineer and justice of peace at Little Falls.

Horace Lester Greene was the forth child of Lester Greene and Emily Herkimer, and was born in 1839 in his grandparents’s  farmhouse at Indian Castle. Horace's oldest brother, Oliver, was born at Danube in 18His older brother, Alonzo Herkimer, was born at Indian Castle in 1834. Horace's sister, Julia Sophia was born in 1837.

Horace’s grandparents, John Lester and Ruth Greene, had spent sixty years of married life together and fifty-five on the same farm. Ruth died there in June or on 17 August 1850. In 1850 John and Ruth Greene had thirty-seven grandchildren. Most of them were living in the town of Danube.  John Lester Greene died on 26 December 1851. Both are buried at the Indian Castle Cemetery in Little Falls.Horace's father, Lester Greene, and his Uncle Zen’s Greene operated a grocery store at the Indian Castle Lock, on the Erie Canal, until about 1856. In 1858, Lester Greene was elected as the candidate of the Republican Party to the Assembly of New York State
Horace Greene was educated in public schools and entered Little Falls Academy in 1855. He studied at the old Fort Plain Seminary in 1856. I image Alonzo and Julia were also educated in public schools. Horace's brother, Alonzo Herkimer Greene, married first on 9 September 1856 to Elizabeth Devendorf, who was born about 1835. Alonzo and Elizabeth had a baby boy born in November 1857; but he died the following summer. The following year, they had another baby boy who died when only two months old. Alonzo's wife died on 9 February 1861. Horace's sister, Julia Sophia Greene, married on 8 December 1859 to George Byron Beach, who died in 1870. She died at Lowville, N.Y. on 18 March 1907, and had three children.

In 1861 the Greene family moved to Little Falls, NY. It was 4:30 AM on April 12, 1861 that a hotheaded South Carolinian rebel fired on Fort Sumter, beginning four years of bloodshed and bitterness of the Civil War.

Horace's father, Lester Greene, was only fifty-six years old when he died in 1863. Alonzo was twenty-nine and was a widower. Horace Greene had studied law and was admitted to the bar on 9 April 1863 at Syracuse, New York.

Where did Emily Herkimer live after her husband died? In 1870 Emily Herkimer Greene was living with her son, Alonzo, in Little Falls. Alonzo was the “First Police Justice” of Little Falls.  Emily was living with her daughter, Julia Beach in 1880 census.

Horace and Annie Greene's first child, Lillian Lester, was born on 25 January 1865 at Little Falls. On 16 December 1866, Horace Greene entered into an insurance partnership with his brother-Alonzo. Alonzo Greene was a civil engineer and was active with the erection of the monument at General Nicholas Herkimer's birthplace. Alonzo Greene was a very active Republican.

Between 1867 and 1880 Horace and Annie Greene had three more children. Josephine Annie was born at Little Falls on 20 August 1867. Nelson Beach Greene was born on 7 November 1869, at Little Falls. Carl Herkimer Greene was born on 6 December 1880, at Fort Plain, New York. He grew up with his older sisters and brother in Ft. Plain NY.
 
On 1 March 1876, Horace purchased the Mohawk Valley Register of Fort Plain. Shortly afterwards, he moved from Little Falls to Fort Plain. In 1885 Horace Greene built a large brown stone Victorian home at the corner of Fifth and West Street at Fort Plain. Horace and Annie Greene's children grew up in the Mohawk Valley NY (Little Falls and Fort Plain).
 
Frederick and Libbie Leppert moved from Canajoharie to Fort Plain about 1885 where they operated a music store. Libbie’s parents owned the Roser Furniture & Undertaker Business in Fort Plain. The Lepperts only had one child, Maude Leppert, who was born in 1882. Frederick was a talented musician and a member of the Old Fort Plain Band for many years. He also played with some of the better bands of his era. As a result he took extended tours of the United States with some of the bands. So Maude Leppert and Carl Greene grew up together in Fort Plain.
 
Lillian Lester Greene attended schools at Little Falls, Fort Plain and graduated from Clinton Liberal Institute. She taught music at several institutions for the blind, in New York City, and from 1893 to 1900 taught music at Fort Plain and Canajoharie. She continued teaching music to the blind at Batavia from 1900 to 1909 and then at a Brooklyn high school from 1910 to 1916. She died unmarried on 19 July 1919.
 
Josephine Annie Greene graduated from Clinton Liberal Institute in 1886 and studied art at New York City. She took up the profession of art teacher, and taught art in at numerous schools. She died, at Ft. Plain unmarried, on 15 March 1911.
 
Nelson Beach Greene attended schools at Fort Plain and, at an early age, contributed articles on local history to his father's paper. In the fall of 1887 Nelson Greene studied art at the Arts Students League at New York City. Nelson was very close to his younger brother, Carlton (Carl). It is said that Carlton is the name on his birth certificate but his name was just Carl.
 
 In 1878 the Fort Plain Seminary was discontinued after an educational career of 36 years. Clinton Liberal Institute of Clinton, N.Y., a school under the patronage of the Universalist Church, purchased the Seminary property and remodeled and enlarged the five-story brick building. C.L.I. relocated in 1879 to Fort Plain and became a noteworthy co-educational, boarding school. It comprised college preparatory, academic, music, art and commercial courses and its cultural influence was great in the Middle Mohawk Valley. In March 1900 the most disastrous fire destroyed the Institute.
 
Horace Greene was closely identified with the Republican Party of Montgomery County and its congressional district.  He was a very active Mason, holding many high positions in that organization. For thirty years, he served the town, county and senatorial committees in various official positions.
 
Horace died in his home at Fort Plain, on 2 October 1891, after suffering for three weeks with typhoid fever. He was only 52 years old. Annie was left to run the newspaper for several years. Carl was only eleven years old when his father died; his sisters and his brother were in their twenties.  His sisters were teachers and never married. Nelson (Ned) continued to live with his mother. Nelson Greene helped his mother to operate the Mohawk Valley Register at Fort Plain for several years after his father's death.
 
Typhoid fever struck the Greene household again. Carl came down with Typhoid. Anna Beach Greene kept a scrape book which contained all kinds of articles, clippings and anything else that pertained to the family or of interest. Unlike his father, Carl survived typhoid fever.
 
Carl and Ned were very close after their father died. Ned was like a father to Carl. Ned became the grandfather figure to Carl’s children.
 
Horace's mother, Emily (Herkimer) Greene died at Little Falls on 18 October 1897; Emily is buried next to her husband, Lester Greene, at the Herkimer Homestead. Lester Greene had died in 1863. Uncle Zenas Greene died at his home on Washington St. at Herkimer on 8 April 1891.
 
Alonzo Greene sold the insurance business that he had for 35 years in Little Falls, and moved to Chicago in 1902 to be with his son, Lester. Alonzo Greene died at Chicago on 18 June 1912 and his 2nd wife, Mary, on 15 January 1914; they are both buried at the Herkimer Homestead.
 
Annie (Beach) Greene became actively involved with the Fort Plain Library Association. She lived at #5 West Street, at Fort Plain until her death on 28 January 1929.
 
Anna Beach Greene wrote the caption above. It was transcribed exactly as much as could be determined. "dc, dbc" are abrev. fro double cousin which I think it means cousin on both the Porter side and Greene side.
Carl Herkimer Greene 1880-1932
Carl Herkimer Greene was born on 6 December 1880, at Fort Plain, New York. He grew up with his two older sisters and brother in Ft. Plain. Lillian Lester, was born in 1865 at Little Falls. Josephine Annie was born at Little Falls in 1867. Nelson Beach Greene was in 1869, at Little Falls.
Frederick C. Leppert was born at Baden, Germany, about 1847/50. He came to America about 1866. After several years he moved to Canajoharie, New York, where he married Sophia Lydia Roser in 1876. Sophia was known as "Libbie" most of her life.
Lillian Lester Greene attended schools at Little Falls, Fort Plain and graduated from Clinton Liberal Institute. She taught music at several institutions for the blind, in New York City, and from 1893 to 1900 taught music at Fort Plain and Canajoharie. She continued teaching music to the blind at Batavia from 1900 to 1909 and then at a Brooklyn high school from 1910 to 1916. She died unmarried on 19 July 1919.
 
Josephine Annie Greene graduated from Clinton Liberal Institute in 1886 and studied art at New York City. She took up the profession of art teacher, and taught art in at numerous schools. She died, at Ft. Plain unmarried, on 15 March 1911.
Nelson Beach Greene attended schools at Fort Plain and, at an early age, contributed articles on local history to his father's paper. In the fall of 1887 Nelson Greene studied art at the Arts Students League at New York City. Nelson was very close to his younger brother, Carlton (Carl). It is said that Carlton is the name on his birth certificate but his name was just Carl.
Frederick and Libbie Leppert moved from Canajoharie to Fort Plain about 1885 where they operated a music store. Libbie’s grandfather owned the Roser Furniture & Undertaker Business in Fort Plain. The Lepperts only had one child, Maude Leppert, who was born in 1882. Frederick was a talented musician and a member of the Old Fort Plain Band for many years. He also played with some of the better bands of his era. As a result he took extended tours of the United States with some of the bands. So Maude Leppert and Carl Greene grew up together in Fort Plain.
 
Carl and Maude had attended Clinton Liberal Institute together. Cornell opened in 1868 and expanded rapidly. Its founders intended that the new university would teach and make contributions in all fields of knowledge—from the classics to the sciences and from the theoretical to the applied. In the fall of 1900 Carl Greene left Fort Plain and headed for Cornell in Ithaca, NY. He had to leave his girlfriend, Maude Leppert
 
While at Cornell, he played football and boxed. During the summer of 1902, Carl worked for the Western Electric Company.  He left Cornell in 1903, not graduating in 1904 as planned. He was in Milwaukee in January of 1904 and in February was working for Koch Advertising Co; he also worked for the Utica Observer. Maude Leppert graduated from Vassar College and was a very talented musician.
 
 On 24 November 1904, Carl Greene married Maude Leppert. The wedding took place at the home of Mr.  & Mrs. Joseph Roser. Probably Carlton's brother, Nelson Greene, was the best man. Nelson Greene and his mother continued to operate the Mohawk Valley Register at Fort Plain for several years after his father's death in 1891.
On 4 February 1905, Nelson (Ned) Greene married Lillian Currier Steinert, who was born at New York City on 26 July 1878 to Howard Gray Steinert and Fannie Beers. Nelson Greene was a historian, sculptor, artist, writer and cartoonist (Puck Magazine). Nelson and Lillian moved to New York. Nelson and Lillian Greene's only child, Sarah (Sally) Currier, was born on 4 April 1907.
 
Carl went into the advertising business at Chicago, where his first son, Nicholas (Nick) Herkimer Greene, was born at Chicago on 28 April 1906. Carlton was then associated with the advertising department of the Utica Observer. Later he went to New York City, where he became an expert in foreign trade advertising.
 
Maude gave birth to their second (and last) son, Frederic Horace, on 25 March 1915. In 1919 the Greene family moved to the suburbs in Bronxville, New York. Carl also had a farm in upper state NY where the family vacationed.
 
Carl’s and Ned’s mother, Anna Beach was alone in that big house at the corner of 5th and West Streets in Fort Plain.  Carl and Ned often visited their mother in Fort Plain. Anna continued to operate the Mohawk paper and active with the Fort Plain Museum and library. Fort Plain 1917 phone book listed Anna as: Greene Mrs. Horace L, 5 West Ft Plain 268-M. At some point in time Ned and his family moved into the “big house” and resumed his mother’s role in the town.
 
In 1915 Ned published Old Fort Plain and the Middle Mohawk Valley, a 400-hundred page volume with five maps, drawn by the author. In 1925 he published THE MOHAWK VALLEY - GATEWAY TO THE WEST - 1614-1925. This four-volume work, consisting of 1898 pages of historical information and 1732 pages of biographical information, is the most comprehensive publication ever produced on the Mohawk Valley.
 
In October 1921, Carl was associated with the U.S. Department of Commerce and was appointed by the Hoover Administration as the Chief of the "Bureau of Commodities" headquartered in Washington D.C. He resigned about a year later, to resume sales and advertising work in New York City, during which time he made extensive tours through Central and South America. At this time the Greene family resided at 110 Merrian Ave. in Bronxville and regularly visited Fort Plain. Bronxville is a small village, only one square mile, only 15 miles from midtown Manhattan.
 
Nelson Greene, became involved with the printing and publishing of the Fort Plain Standard. Nelson Greene was in charge of the editorial and news work from 1922 until 1939. Nelson and Lillian moved from New York City to Fort Plain in 1924. Nelson became a noted artist-writer, and wrote about ten books concerning the history and people of the Mohawk Valley. Nelson and Lillian lived at 5th & West Streets with his mother, Annie Lydia (Beach) Greene. Nick Greene often stayed with his grandparents, Horace and Anna Greene, at Fort Plain and attended school there for several years. The DeWandelaer family lived in Fort Plain. Nick became friends with the DeWandelaer sisters, Ruth and Dorothy. Nick married Ruth in 1928 and lived in Philadelphia PA.
 
In May 1932 Carl, Maude and Fred took one of their many trips to see Grandma Anna Greene. On the way home Carl began to feel ill and had abdominal pains.  They finally had to stop in an upstate town that had a hospital. It turned out Carl had appendicitis. Before they could operate his appendix burst. His system was flooded with poison. Carl then developed a case of hiccoughs that they could not stop. After a week to ten days he died at the hospital.
 
When Maude’s mother, Grandma Leppert, died she was living with Maude and Carl in Bronxville. When Grandma Leppert died Maude was left alone in Bronxville. Nick was married and Fred was at Annapolis. About 1933 Maude suffered a stroke. She was in her early fifties. Nick had his mother hospitalized and she never recovered from her stroke. Nick looked into her affairs only to discover her money was gone and she had not paid her mortgage. Nick could not recoup anything and ended up losing it all to the bank. Nick had to take her home to Philadelphia. They tried having her live with them, but it was too much and she was moved to a nursing home nearby. Meanwhile Nick emptied the house and dispersed the furniture in Bronxville. Maude lived for nine years in the miserable state and passed away about 1943.
Nicholas Herkimer Greene 1906-1980
Nicholas Herkimer Greene was the first son and was born on 28 April 1906 at Chicago, where his father temporarily had his advertising business. His father, Carlton Greene, was then associated with the advertising department of the Utica Observer. Later he went to New York City, where he became an expert in foreign trade advertising. Maude gave birth to their second (and last) son, Frederick Horace, on 25 March 1915 at Bronxville, New York.
In October 1921, Nick's father was associated with the U.S. Department of Commerce and was appointed by the Hoover Administration as the Chief of the "Bureau of Commodities" headquartered in Washington D.C. He resigned about a year later, to resume sales and advertising work in New York City, during which time he made extensive tours through Central and South America. At this time the Greenes resided at 110 Merrian Ave. in Bronxville, and often visited Fort Plain.
 
Nicholas Greene visited his grandparents, Horace and Anna Greene, at Fort Plain and attended school there for several years. . The DeWandelaer family lived in Fort Plain. Nick became friends with the DeWandelaer sisters, Ruth and Dorothy.  . Dorothy DeWandelaer was born in 1904 and Ruth DeWandelaer in 1905.For several summers, he worked for the Montgomery Light & Power Co. of Canajoharie. His uncle - William Roser was president and general superintendent of the company.
 
Later Nick's uncle, Nelson Greene, became involved with the printing and publishing of the Fort Plain Standard. Nelson Greene was in charge of the editorial and news work from 1922 until 1939. Nelson and Lillian moved from New York City to Fort Plain in 1924. Nelson became a noted artist-writer, and wrote about ten books concerning the history and people of the Mohawk Valley. Nelson and Lillian lived at #5 West Street with Nick’s grandmother, Annie Lydia (Beach) Greene. 
 
Nicholas wanted to study engineering but his father, Carl, said there was no future in engineering so study business. Within one year of graduating, Nick lack one credit in Physical Ed. So in his senior year he took Boxing 101. During a bout his opponent broke his nose. Thus his nose never matched his father’s or grandfather’s. Nicholas graduated from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in 1928. While at the University of Penna., he was stroke for one of the eight oared crews for two years.
 He married on 15 August 1928, at Philadelphia, to Ruth Rosemary DeWandelaer, who he knew from his visits to Fort Plain. Nick and Ruth settled in the Germantown section of Philadelphia. Nicholas Herkimer Greene Jr. was born Friday 13 February 1931.  Nicholas worked with the Philadelphia Electric Company from 1928 to 1973. Ruth's sister, Dorothy DeWandelaer, married Richard J. Walker on 31 January 1931. Richard Walker also worked for the Philadelphia Electric Company. Dorothy and Richard first settled in Philadelphia. This was the beginning of the depression; however Aunt Minnie’s husband, William Taylor, was president of the Philadelphia Electric Company.
In May 1932 Carl, Maude and Fred took one of their many trips to see Grandma Anna Greene. On the way home Carl began to feel ill and had abdominal pains. They finally had to stop in an upstate town that had a hospital. It turned out Carl had appendicitis. Before they could operate his appendix burst. His system was flooded with poison. Carl then developed a case of hiccoughs that they could not stop. After a week to ten days he died at the hospital.
 
When Maude’s mother died “Grandpa Leppert” lived with Maude and Carl in Bronxville... When Grandpa Leppert died Maude was left al one in Bronxville. Nick was married and Fred was at Annapolis. About 1933 Maude suffered a stroke. She was in her early fifties. Nick had his mother hospitalized and she never recovered from her stroke. Nick looked into her affairs only to discover her money was gone and she had not paid her mortgage. Nick could not recoup anything and ended up losing it all to the bank. Nick had to take her home to Philadelphia. They tried having her live with them, but it was too much and she was moved to a nursing home nearby. Meanwhile Nick emptied the house and dispersed the furniture in Bronxville. Maude lived for nine years in the miserable state and passed away about 1943
 
In April 1935 Ruth gave birth to a baby girl, Ann DeWandelaer Greene. The Greene family moved from Germantown to Wadsworth Street in Mt. Airy, a suburb in Philadelphia. It was a stone, twin home with four bedrooms and two baths.  The movie “Snow White “was released in 1937. Nick and Ruth decided to take the children to see the movie. Ann got so scared in the forest scene Nick had to take his daughter out of the theatre. Ruth stayed while Nick Jr. was engrossed in the film.
 
Nick's brother, Frederic Horace Greene, graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1938, and married at Bronxville on 22 June 1940 to Cathryne Blanche (Peggy) Greene (no relation). She was born at Bronxville on 9 March 1917. They lived most of their married life at Westfield, N.J., and moved to Kill Devill Hills, N.C., after he retired from Standard Oil of New Jersey in 1975. He died on 28 December 1983 at Newport News, NC They had 3 children: Patricia born in 1942, Elizabeth born in 1944 and John Herkimer born in 1947.
It was spring of 1939 that Ruth became ill. She was bed ridden for three week before Ruth died at Philadelphia on 24 June 1939, leaving Nicholas with two children. Nick was nine and I four years old. There was little support for Nick, only from the DeWandelaers.  Nick’s mother was in a nursery home. His father had died in 1932 and his brother was a cadet at Annapolis Naval Academy.  Ruth’s mother had died in 1932.
 
Ruth’s sister, and Aunt Minnie took charge. Aunt Minnie was Ruth’s mother’s sister. For six months Nick tried to get care for his kids, with little success. Meanwhile he was seeing Louise Pitcher, Ruth’s second cousin, who he met at Ruth’s funeral. Louise had a grand solution to solve Nick’s problems. Why don’t they get married?
 
Nicholas remarried at Philadelphia on 30 December 1939 to Ruth's cousin, Florence Louise Pitcher. Louise was born on 27 July 1907 at Cooperstown, New York, to Ernest Leroy Pitcher and Florence Eugina Weller. Now Louise's grandmother (Florence DeWandelaer Weller) and Ruth's grandfather (Capt... John DeWandelaer) were brother and sister. Nicholas and Louise lived in the Mount Airy section of Philadelphia. On April 20, 1941 they had a baby girl, Priscilla Louise Greene.
 
Nick's mother, Maude (Leppert) Greene, was in ill health for a number of years, having suffered from a stroke and died at Philadelphia on 29 June 1945. Nick was straddled with the expense of his mother's care since his younger brother was a cadet at the US Naval Academy. Maude was in a nursing home for almost ten years.
After Nicholas retired from the Philadelphia Electric Co., he and Louise moved to Lanoka Harbor, New Jersey, where they managed "Murray Grove", a Universalist-Unitarian retreat. Nicholas and Louise were ardent Universalists and spent much of their time serving in local and state church affairs.
 
In January 1979, while on a vacation in Florida, Nicholas suffered a severe heart attack. Nick and Louise decided to live in Largo, Fla. for reasons of his health. He died on 24 March 1980, after another heart attack in his sleep. He is buried in the Cooperstown Cemetery. Remember Ruth (DeWandelaer) Greene is buried in Ft. Plain. Louise (Pitcher) Greene remarried on 1 May 1982 to Howard Whittmeyer. Louise suffered from Alzheimer’s  and died 13 May 1984 at Philadelphia, and is also buried at the Cooperstown Cemetery.