GanesvoortAncestors

The Gansevoort surname was probably derived from the name of a town- Ganzfort, that is located at Westfalen, which is situated on the border of Germany and Holland.  The Gansevoort family of early Albany traces its roots to Harmen Harmanse and Maria Conyn Gansevoort in 1660s. Their son, brewer/businessman Leendert Gansevoort, established the family in the city as three sons became Albany householders
Harmen Gansevoort led the family from brewing to business and brought it to the top echelon of early Albany society. Harme's sons, Leonard Gansevoort and Peter Gansevoort, became leaders in the Revolutionary movement and in the establishment of the new state .and nation. In 1790, five Gansevoort named households were listed on the city census.  The family plot on the east side of Market Street encompassed the brewery and homes for more than a hundred years. The dock at the end of Maiden Lane was known as "Gansevoort's wharf."
Harmen (Harmense) Van Gansevoort 1630s - 1710
Harmen (Harmanse) Van Gansevoort was born during the 1630s. He is believed to have been a native of Westphalia.  Hecame to Beverwyck, New Netherlands (New York) from Groningen, Holland, sometime before the spring of 1657, and maybe as early as 1655. There are no records of Harmen Gansevoort's birth date, his place of birth or the exact time of his arrival to America or to Beverwyck. It is believed that Harmen was born between 1635 and 1645. There are records of Gansevoorts, including a Harmanus Gansevoort from the Groningen area of the Netherlands, nearby northern Germany. Harmen Gansevoort and the other emigrants had served out the six years, as payment for their passage. In 1686, the English Governor issued the Dungan Charter, which gave the Albanians extensive tracts of land and a government elected by the inhabitants.
 
Harmen Gansevoort had a brewery at the settlement of Bethlehem, south of the Normanskill River and also owned land at Catskill.
 
In the early 1660's, Harmen left his brewery in Bethlehem to try his hand at farming, on a 44 acre site on the Catskill Creek, about 30 miles south of Albany. He married a brewer's daughter Maria Conyn, and was the patriarch of the Albany Gansevoort family. She was the daughter of Beverwyck brewer/trader Leendert Conyn and his wife, Agnietie. According to familybased resources, Leendert Phillipse Conyn (Conine) was born at Ghent in the Netherlands in 1620
 
Harmen and Maria Gansevoort's first four children [Elsje in 1668, Agnietje about 1670, Maria and Anna before 1676] were born on the farm. Harmen sold this farm in 1678, and returned permanently to Albany to establish a brewery business.
Johannes and Sarah DeWandelaer settled in Albany in 1670s. Johannes de Wandelaer Jr. was born in 1676, and Sarah gave birth to eight more children. Catharine DeWandelaer was their seventh child was born in 1689. Johannes was an Alderman in 1686, and an Assessor in the 1st Ward of Albany from 1691 to 1694.
 
By 1677 Harmen purchased a house lot on what became the east side of Market Street where it intersected with Maiden Lane. In 1679, he was identified as an Albany householder. In 1684, his Albany taxes were in arrears. In 1697, his riverside Albany household included six children. By that time, he had become a member of the Albany Dutch church. Previously, he had been a Lutheran.
Between 1679 and 1693 Harmen and Maria Gansevoort had eight more children born at Albany: seven more girls and one boy. Lysbeth Gansevoort was born about 1681 and Leendert Ganesvoort was born about 1682. They may have been twins! At least they were very close. Now Catharine (Catharina) DeWandelaer was born in 1689. She was the youngest of the DeWandelaer eight children. More than likely the Gansevoort and DeWandelaer children were playmates.
 
Called "Harme de Brouwer," he built a brewery on his riverside property and was among seventeenth century Albany's most prominent brewers. He also engaged in the fur trade and was brought to court for not paying the "tapping excise." In his later years, he was called on by the city government to perform various tasks.
Harmen Gansevoort took the Oath of Allegiance, at Albany, on 4 January 1699. Harmen Harmense was a Lutheran and his short temper was notorious, especially when he was intoxicated. Harmen became an Albany Lutheran leader and fought the pressures of Calvanism (Dutch Reform Church).
Harmen Gansevoort died on 23 July 1710 and was buried at his Lutheran church on South Pearl Street, where a market was later built. Maria was buried 7 January 1743. She was either much younger than Harmen or lived to a very old age.
 
 
Leendert Phillipse Gansevoort 1683 - 1762
Lysbeth Gansevoort was born about 1681 and Leendert Ganesvoort was born September 1683. He was the only surviving son of Harmen Ganesvoort. The brother and sister were very close.
 
Lysbeth Gansevoort married at Albany on 6 April 1701 to Johannes DeWandelaer. They moved from Albany, about 1719, to the Schaghticoke Tract and became tenant farmers. Johannes died there, and they had at least ten children, including our ancestor- Pieter DeWandelaer
On 11 May 1712, Leendert Gansevoort married at Albany to Catherine (Catharina) DeWandelaer. After his father's death, Leendert bought out the shares of the brewery from his seven surviving sisters. Leendert followed his father in the brewing business. He also prospered to the point where he was elected alderman for the third ward from 1734 to 1739. His brewery behind the family property on the east side of Market Street was an Albany landmark for much of the eighteenth century. On a number of occasions, he delivered beer for the city government.
 
He further increased his wealth by operating the brewery, and by investing the proceeds into mortgages on City properties and developed farms. The brewery prospered because of the expanding population in the area (10,000 by 1737), that included some of the Palatine Germans brought to Albany, by Robert Livingston, in 1710. . This prosperous and politically active brewer was always counted among the city's qualified voters. His status was further documented and memorialized in a set of portraits done about 1720. No other Albany brewer was so favored! He is remembered as a man of small stature, of placid and serene countenance, and of upright character.
 
Leendert Gansevoort was listed as a freeholder, of the 3rd Ward of Albany, in 1720. He was a Constable in 1710 and a Fire master.
Their first child, Harmen, born in 1712.  Harman Ganesvoort son Peter became a general in the Revolution. By 1730, their eight children were baptized and both parents served as frequent baptism sponsors.
 
Their youngest child, Pieter Gansevoort was born in 1725. He was a classical scholar, studied medicine at Boston and became a physician.
 
A "sickness" swept through Albany during the winter of 1731-32 - decimating the city's population. Virtually every household was effected. Over the winter of 1731-32, a sickness (probably smallpox) swept Albany. Dutch church records recorded more than seventy burials for that time - as the disease claimed a large slice of the city's population. Before the end of the year, the Gansevoorts had paid dearly. On December 31, 1731, thirteen year old Sara was buried along with her infant sister Agnietie (Agnes) in the Dutch Church cemetery. Sara's portrait, painted by Nehemiah Partridge, is graphic evidence of her parent's affection.
 
This prosperous and politically active brewer was always counted among the city's qualified voters. His status was further documented and memorialized in a set of portraits done about 1720. No other Albany brewer was so favored! In 1741, he was among the worthies favored with a share in the Sacandaga Patent.
 
Leendert Gansevoort filed a will in September 1762 - leaving an extensive estate to his wife during her widowhood and then to his two sons and the children of his sister. He died in December 1762 months short of his eightieth birthday. In 1763, his name still appeared on an Albany freeholders list. Leendert's will passed probate that August of 1650.
 
The will instructed her not to dispose of any of the estate but to benefit from its incomes. Her name appeared on an assessment roll as the owner of their substantial third ward home and lot in 1767. Catharina De Wandelaer Gansevoort died in August 1767 - days shy of her seventy-ninth birthday. It was in a large measure through her strong character and superior business abilities that her husband was enabled to accumulate a comfortable fortune. One of her descendants writing of her said that "her activity of mind made her quite a business woman and rendered her a great blessing to her husband, who was a quiet, moderate man." Children:
The paintings of Leendert, Catherine are part of the "Gansevoort Limner". The designation "Gansevoort Limner" was given to the unkown painter of a stylistically coherent group of portraits depicting members of the Gansevoort family. The majority of his sitters were children, and several of his portraits are inscribed in either Dutch or Latin.
 
Mary Black has identified The Gansevoort Limner as Pieter Vanderlyn, which some scholars accept. No signed portraits by Vanderlyn exist, however, and over the years controversy has continued over Vanderlyn's identity and oeuvre. Local tradition originally ascribed a number of The Gansevoort Limner portraits to Vanderlyn; descendants of the subjects believed him to be the creator of their family portraits
 
Until further evidence comes to light, it cannot be said with complete certainty that The Gansevoort Limner is Pieter Vanderlyn. If they are, The Gansevoort Limner was born in Holland about 1687, coming to New York from Curaçao around 1718. He traveled frequently between Albany and Kingston until 1777, then moved to Shawangunk, New York. He died there in 1778.
Pieter Ganesvoort 1725 - 1809
Pieter Gansevoort was born in July 1725. He was the youngest son of Leendert and Catharina De Wandelaer Gansevoort. He grew up at the family brewery facing Market Street  and along the Albany waterfront.
 
With traditional family enterprises staked out by his older brothers, young Peter embarked on a more unique career path when he was sent to Boston for medical training. The particulars and duration of that education have not yet been uncovered. But by the 1750s, he had returned home, married, and set up an Albany-based medical practice that led to a lifetime of service to family members and their kin. Gansevoort was a doctor who studied medicine with a Boston physician and later held "the reputation of a classical scholar," an unusual avocation for mid-eighteenth-century Albany.
 
In 1752, Pieter married Gerritje Ten Eyc.She  was born in August 1728. She was the youngest daughter of Albany silversmith Coenradt Ten Eyck and his wife, Gerritje Van Schaick. Her older brother was named mayor of Albany in 1748.. By 1770, their ten children had been baptized in the Albany Dutch Church where he was a pewholder.
 
Known in local circles as "Dr. Gansevoort," he does not seem to have been an active participant in business or trade and mostly stayed out of civic affairs. He lived comfortably in the house on Market Street, which he inherited from his parents. Pieter Ganesvoort did serve in the militia, supported other community-based activities, and later noted as a classical scholar. His name appeared on an Albany freeholders list in 1763.
 
His wife died in 1782. By the 1790s, he was a grandfather who had retired to his substantial Market Street home under the care of his grown children. Dr. Peter Gansevoort died in March 1809 - shy of his eighty-fourth birthday. His will passed probate two months later.
Reference: Note from http://www.nysm.nysed.gov/albany/bios/g/leegansevoort4656.html :
The identity of the boy in this portrait was long believed to be Pieter ("Pau" was a diminutive nickname for Pieter) de Wandelaer, however, recent research has more strongly suggested Pau Gansevoort as the sitter. Gansevoort was a doctor who studied medicine with a Boston physician and later held "the reputation of a classical scholar," an unusual avocation for mid-eighteenth-century Albany. The subject is believed to have been between seventeen and twenty-seven years old, and is dressed in a common early-eighteenth century style with a homespun jerkin (jacket). A native goldfinch perches on his hand, and the landscape behind him features the Hudson River and a work yacht flying the British Union Jack flag. Based on similarities in the painting style, this is one of about twenty portraits attributed to the "Gansevoort Limner".
Ten Eyck Ancestors
Pieter Ganesvoort married Geritje TenEyck.in 1752. Gerritje Ten Eyck was born in August 1728. She was the youngest daughter of Albany silversmith Coenradt Ten Eyck and his wife, Gerritje Van Schaick. By 1770, their ten children had been baptized in the Albany Dutch church where she was an occasional baptism sponsor. In 1754, she was named to share in the estate of her uncle, Samuel Coeymans. This doctor's family lived on Market Street near Peter's extensive family. Gerritje Ten Eyck Gansevoort died in July 1782 - a month shy of her fifty-fourth birthday. After that, her husband was absorbed in family households and lived until 1809.
 
Gerritje Van Schaick was born in September 1687. She was the eldest daughter of Albany residents Anthony and Maria Vanderpoel Van Schaick. Just past her seventeenth birthday, Gerritje married silversmith Coenradt Ten Eyck at her father's Albany home on September 24, 1704. Seven months later, the first of her ten children was baptized in the Albany Dutch church. The Ten Eycks lived in the first ward where Coenradt was a prominent businessman and Albany official. Over the next decades, their fortunes were bolstered by substantial bequests from Gerritje's family - the Van Schaicks. By the late 1740s, they had moved across State Street to a "good house" in the third ward.
Coenradt Ten Eyck was born in 1678. He was the first son born to Jacob Ten Eyck and Geertje Coeymans . Jacob was a shoemaker who moved to Albany after 1664 and established the Ten Eyck family in the upper Hudson region. Losing his father during his adolescence, Coenradt's path forward would come through service and hopefully lead to an apprenticeship.
 
Coenradt Ten Eyck reached adulthood in the home of his widowed mother. By the early 1700s, he was identified as the head of that first ward household. Trained by Cornelis Kierstede, he became a silversmith and worked in Albany and in New York City. Coenradt TenEyck married Albany native Gerritje Van Schaick in 1704.
 
Over the next half century, he cemented his Albany ties serving as a constable (and high constable), juror, assessor, and assistant alderman beginning in 1706. During these years, his home was valued on city assessment rolls. In 1715, he belonged to an Albany-based militia troop. During that time he was active in committee work, represented Albany in New York, managed municipal projects, and performed contract work as far away as Oswego. In 1747. He was living in the third ward and was elected alderman.
 
Coenradt Ten Eyck died in January 1753 several months shy of his seventy-fifth birthday. His wife lived on in their State Street home for several years. Eight of their children married and extended the Ten Eyck name in the region for generations to come. His son, Jacob C. Ten Eyck, was named mayor of Albany in 1748!
 
Gerritje Van Schaick was born in September 1687. She was the eldest daughter of Albany residents Anthony and Maria Vanderpoel Van Schaick. Just past her seventeenth birthday, Gerritje married silversmith Coenradt Ten Eyck at her father's Albany home on September 24, 1704. Seven months later, the first of her ten children was baptized in the Albany Dutch church. The Ten Eycks lived in the first ward where Coenradt was a prominent businessman and Albany official. Over the next decades, their fortunes were bolstered by substantial bequests from Gerritje's family - the Van Schaicks. By the late 1740s, they had moved across State Street to a "good house" in the third ward.
 
Gerritje lost her husband early in 1753. She inherited the use of his property and was a well-known Albany householder for the next decade. Eight of her children married and raised their own families. Her son, Jacob, became mayor of Albany in 1748. Daughter Anna Margarita married future mayor John Barclay in 1771. In November 1756, Gerritje filed her will. It named her seven living children. The will passed probate in October 1768.
 
 
 
Paneled brandywine bowl, c. 1730-1750, by Jacob Coenradt Ten Eyck

Beautiful watercolors of early Albany by James Eights.

James Eights was Albany's first historical artist. He also was a scientist and naturalist, an antiquarian historian, and a writer. But because most of his achievements took place well into the nineteenth century, his principal contribution to the early Albany story took the form of a series of cityscape drawings and paintings that showed Albany as he remembered it in his childhood. Click on the paintings for an enlargement.
This beautiful watercolor is one of more than a dozen views of early Albany as remembered by Albany native James Eights. This one showing The east side of North Market Street adapted and printed in a number of forms and formats. Many people "own" artistic renditions of this "classic" cityscape.
The intersection of Court and Hudson Streets in 1800 - north to the old Dutch church
Looking down State Street before the Dutch Reformed Church was demolished in 1806! Many slightly different versions of this view exist in color and in black-and-white.

On the far left or behind the upper north side of State Street is the head of Maiden Lane. The hill in the distance is up from the river in Greenbush and beyond the Albany riverfront skyline. In the foreground on the right (south side) are two men sawing a log in front of James Chestney's chair factory at 134 State Street.